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Posts Tagged ‘Amy Senn’

Rule number one in gardening….JUST DO IT!  If you’ve ever been too timid to put a particular vegetable in the ground, don’t be. There is a ton of information out there on the internet and plenty of seasoned gardeners and farmers who are more than willing to pass on valuable information…like us, here at Rock Star Farms. 

It wasn’t too long ago that I was just plain scared of planting something like an onion because I had no idea how to do it – what type to choose, where to plant them, how to care for them…the excuses just went on and on.  I’m thrilled to say, thanks to my experience here on the farm and priceless guidance from a variety of seasoned farmers, these fears are slowing being erased.

We’re planting onions!!  

Back in late January we selected several varieties (yellow granex, first edition, candy, red candy apple and copra). All in all about 1,000 little seedlings went into the bed. Unfortunately we had some pretty severe weather that wiped out a little under half of what we planted, but we still have over 500 onion plants growing strong that will be ready for harvest in the next couple of months!

So, no matter what you want to start planting this spring, don’t let fear of the unknown stop you and always plant more than what you want because there inevitably will be casualties. 

If you want some quick tips on growing onions, click here

And as always, thanks for checking us out and HAPPY FARMING!

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Sunshine Diaz, left, Amy Senn, center and Patrick Stacey lay out produce as they prepare to put together CSA packages at Rock Star Farms in Forsyth County.

When the Gainesville Times called last Wednesday to request a tour of the farm and an interview, we were happy to accommodate.  They had been pointed in our direction by Georgia Organics, who this past weekend, hosted the Georgia Organics Conference in Athens where hundreds of  farmers and garden enthusiasts gathered to network and participate in educational workshops.

The resulting article not only provides a nice mention about Rock Star Farms, but gives a great overview on what’s happening on the political front as it relates to agriculture here in GA. Currently there are several bills being presented which will greatly affect small farmers in and around the Southeast. Check out the article, find out how to get involved and remember to always…

“Vote with your fork!”

Here’s an excerpt from the article which appeared in Sunday’s paper

Organic farmers hope to reap benefits from leadership change
Local growers seek policies helpful to industry from new ag commissioner

By Ashely Fielding

Sunshine Diaz picking lettuce at Rock Star Farms Image by Tom Reed (Gainesville Times)

Sunshine Diaz, owner of Rock Star Farms in Gainesville, has hope that the Georgia’s attitude toward small and organic producers will change. Diaz and her husband, who have been involved with Georgia Organics for the last three years, started their own naturally-grown produce farm near Browns Bridge Road last summer.

“I think the more we have local farms, the more we empower our communities, and there’s nothing you can do to stop that once it gets started. And it is started,” Diaz said.

But Nashville-based goat farmer Tom Kuettner said he won’t be looking for any help from the state’s new ag commissioner.

“I haven’t seen anything I like in the ag department,” Kuettner said.

Still, he is looking for legislation that affects smaller farmers and those who cater to the emerging demand for local food.

Visit the Gainesville Times to read the entire article. All images provided by Tom Reed of the Gainesville Times.

Click here to learn more about Georgia Organics.


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Sunshine showing off Rock Star Farms winter veggies - best tasting greens you'll ever eat...guaranteed!

We’re super excited to tell you that Rock Star Farms is ready to launch our first winter CSA!  We’ll provide organic and bio-dynamically grown winter veggies for 10 families beginning this week. More shares will become available in the spring. Watch your email for more information, and in case you are wondering what the heck a CSA is and why its important to join one,  check out this article from localharvest.org

Over the last 20 years, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) has become a popular way for consumers to buy local, seasonal food directly from a farmer. Here are the basics: a farmer offers a certain number of “shares” to the public. Typically the share consists of a box of vegetables, but other farm products may be included. Interested consumers purchase a share (aka a “membership” or a “subscription”) and in return receive a box (bag, basket) of seasonal produce each week throughout the farming season.

This arrangement creates several rewards for both the farmer and the consumer.  In brief…

Advantages for farmers:

  • Get to spend time marketing the food early in the year, before their 16 hour days in the field begin
  • Receive payment early in the season, which helps with the farm’s cash flow
  • Have an opportunity to get to know the people who eat the food they grow

Advantages for consumers:

  • Eat ultra-fresh food, with all the flavor and vitamin benefits
  • Get exposed to new vegetables and new ways of cooking
  • Usually get to visit the farm at least once a season
  • Find that kids typically favor food from “their” farm – even veggies they’ve never been known to eat
  • Develop a relationship with the farmer who grows their food and learn more about how food is grown

Click here to read the full article from Local Harvest.Org

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timemagazinearticle

The Rock Star Farms crew was on our way to Roots Farm in Athens, GA on Friday night for a slow food dinner (which by the way was STELLAR!) and passed 3 Burger King’s, all with signs that read $1 double cheeseburgers.  I thought to myself, “No way. How can they make a profit, and if they are, what kind of wretched ingredients are they putting in there?” Its becoming more and more apparent everyday that for the average family in America its cheaper to buy greasy and nutrient void fast food than healthy nutrient rich vegetables and animal products. Or is it?  Once you take into account the affects of food production on the land and the people,  energy used to ship said foods, treatment of the animals that are harvested for the foods, long term effects and health concerns, that $1 double cheeseburger ain’t as cheap as it seems.

Here’s a great article from Time Magazine by Bryan Walsh, that will explain all of this a little bit more.

Somewhere in Iowa, a pig is being raised in a confined pen, packed in so tightly with other swine that their curly tails have been chopped off so they won’t bite one another. To prevent him from getting sick in such close quarters, he is dosed with antibiotics. The waste produced by the pig and his thousands of pen mates on the factory farm where they live goes into manure lagoons that blanket neighboring communities with air pollution and a stomach-churning stench. He’s fed on American corn that was grown with the help of government subsidies and millions of tons of chemical fertilizer. When the pig is slaughtered, at about 5 months of age, he’ll become sausage or bacon that will sell cheap, feeding an American addiction to meat that has contributed to an obesity epidemic currently afflicting more than two-thirds of the population. And when the rains come, the excess fertilizer that coaxed so much corn from the ground will be washed into the Mississippi River and down into the Gulf of Mexico, where it will help kill fish for miles and miles around. That’s the state of your bacon — circa 2009. (See TIME’s photo-essay “From Farm to Fork.”)

Click here to read the entire article.

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